Downloading magazines from the Internet Archive (and making gifs from their covers)

I like reading old magazines and books over at the Internet Archive. They've got a great online reader that works just fine in the browser. But sometimes I want a local copy I can put on my tablet or other device. And reading locally saves them some bandwidth. Downloading individual items is simple, but it … Continue reading Downloading magazines from the Internet Archive (and making gifs from their covers)

Thinking through decentralisation as a process, not an architecture

I tweeted this the other day: https://twitter.com/ldodds/status/1458562522919936001 I don't claim this is a new or even particularly profound insight. But I do sometimes feel that discussion around the need for more decentralised products and services focuses more the technical design of a system, rather than how it is governed. An expectation that a decentralised protocol … Continue reading Thinking through decentralisation as a process, not an architecture

Long live RSS! How I manage my reading

"LONG LIVE RSS!" I shout these words from my bedroom window every morning. Reaffirming my love for this century's most criminally neglected data standard. If you've either forgotten, or never enjoyed, the ease of managing your information consumption via the magic of RSS and a feed reader, then you're missing out mate. Struggling with the … Continue reading Long live RSS! How I manage my reading

The British Hypertextual Society (1905-2017)

With their globe-spanning satellite network nearing completion, Peter Linkage reports on some of the key milestones in the history of the British Hypertextual Society. The British Hypertextual Society was founded in 1905 with a parliamentary grant from the Royal Society of London. At the time there was growing international interest in finding better ways to manage … Continue reading The British Hypertextual Society (1905-2017)

A river of research, not news

I already hate the phrase "fake news". We have better words to describe lies, disinformation, propaganda and slander, so lets just use those. While the phrase "fake news" might originally have been used to refer to hoaxes and disinformation, it's rapidly becoming a meaningless term used to refer to anything you don't disagree with. Trump's recent … Continue reading A river of research, not news